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so far. >> a former child soldier, one of the so-called lost boys of sudan has come to the u.n. to add his voice to the debate. he says nations must speak out against the arms trade by signing this treaty. >> silence in itself is violence. if you know, if you're turning a blind eye of any situation, you actually are committing a crime. those are committing the atrocities and those turning a blind eye on it. here they have the power to turn everything around. >> the big question being asked in the other doers of the u.n., what positions will they take? they're keeping their card close to their chest. eight months ago when the treaty was lost on the table, the u.s. postponed things saying they needed more time to study the details. there will be 10 days of hard negotiations. if a treaty is to be signed, it has to happen before the end of this month. james baze, al jazeera, at the united nations. >> let's take a closer look at the flow of the international weapons trade. we begin with the biggest exporters. nearly a 1/3 of weapons worldwide come from the united states where russia
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
ever been. in term of global poverty the only u.n. goal is having more than having by 2015. and the middle class, and this is a really stunning news, if you look at where asia is today, they are 500 million people living in middle-class living standards today in 2013 in asia. by 2020, which is seven years in now, the number will explode from 500 million to 1.75 billion. an increase of 3.5 times in seven years. we've never seen this before in human history. that's going to change the chemistry of the world and create more positive glow around the world. >> so you will go from 500 million to 1.75 billion people in the asian middle class. so this asian middle class will now, in a sense, dominate the world economically, politically, culturally. >> in terms of economics, if you run any kind of major corporation, anywhere in the world and looking for markets and this is what ceos tell me from time to time that they do all of their projections and the future markets are in asia and inevidentably it is one of the largest markets for cultural products. the political theory, the one
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
in the u.n. or the international criminal court. >> we'll see whacomes out. and then john kerry is going to follow up on this. but i suspect that from the way that the wording is coming out there may be a softening of positions on both sides on this in terms of settlement. a restraining settlement activity. >> rose: and palestinian initiatives in the u.n.. >> right. >> rose: okay. the last one is empower secretary of state kerry. >> he hasn't done that yet. he really needs to do it because he's given this speech which has raised expectations sky-high about what the united states is going to do in the peace process. and if he doesn't back kerry up, because kerry is the one that is going to be doing it, kerry won't be able to succeed. >> my guess is knowing secretary kerry and knowing secretary clinton, that secretary kerry will give this because he passionately is interested in this more tension, individually on his own, than secretary clinton. >> he says it that the time, sorry, that the time for middlest envoy is over. >> he is a secretary that is widely prceived as being verylose to th
look at the reform, you will want singapore's ambassador of the u.n. you tried to get india on china vetoes and you tried to take nigeria, the south africans get upset or vice versa. it's never going to happen. >> but you're absolutely right. and that's precisely the problem that for every japan, there's a south kor that says no. all the losers, the mexicos, the pakistans, the south koreas, others actually become winners and they get automatic seat in the security council at every fourth turn. now, that's a remarkable improvement for countries that have to spend millions of dollars to try to get re-elected back to the security council every four years. now, i'm saying, you have a seat. so, it's a win, win, win for the small states, the middle powers and the great powers. that's why i think eventually, not right away, the 777 formula can break the current lock on security council reform. >> great thing about this book, a lot of insight at 30,000 feet and also insight at the ground level because you live through these processes. pleasure to have you on. >> my pleasure. thank you for ha
resolution that gets voted on at the u.n. as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that you, that we were discussing. we went to paris, we went to paris, egypt and then tunis. and it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, you know, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want, or we can actually try to shape this into something that is going to deliver people. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it's might be the most, i think, historical. >> guest: yes. i love that chapter. >> host: and just talk about what made that trip so unique. obviously, not very many people are traveling to burma at least from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more, but certainly at the time it was very, very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to, um, when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers, this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my persona
to protect civilians. that's the final resolution that gets voted on at the u.n., as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that we were discussing, we went to paris. we went to paris, egypt and into this. it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want or we can try to shape us into something that is going to deliver. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it might be the most historical. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique. obvious that not very many people have gone to burma. >> guest: more and more of a string of the time it was very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, no, my book will do for readers. is this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and
, the 970's decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq and those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities byiraq that were rocked these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. they blame the people who committed those murders. to a cityen we went where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. these are not just insurgencies that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. communities have fallen in on haveelves -- marketplaces close
are still required to pay taxes. n, one thing that is important to note is your u.s. citizen children, they are eligible for certain benefits because they are u.s. citizens. although you are not, it is important for you to know there are resources out there to support your children depending on what their needs are. i think he also raises an important question which is, what are the requirements people will have to go through in order to apply for some kind of earned citizenship. one thing considered is definitely there will be a panel become a pretty hefty penalty. second, people will have to pay fees for that application. the program will most likely have to be self sustaining. third, both the senate and house will be considering back taxes for people who may be did not pay taxes. finally, a requirement that people speak english or demonstrate an ability to speak english. that is one piece that is not known exactly yet in terms of -- will people have to pass a test, well then have to show they are enrolled in school, etc.? that is one potential area for people m people martin who do
. my question dovetails with jo n's question. based on your withdrawal from iraq, afghanistan, pivot to asia, is the u.s. committed to the gulf region and the middle east in general? if you could elaborate a little more on the general commitment in the region, and if the answer is yes, how can we find more ways to demonstrate that commitment? >> the answer is yes, and expanded answer to that would indeed be how can we find ways to demonstrate our commitment differently. this notion of withdrawing from iraq and afghanistan, as somehow indicative of less commitment to the region, i really would like to react to that. andent three years in iraq, what you have to say -- and we are all aware that tomorrow is the 10-year anniversary and the debate goes on about whether we should have, whether it was worth it, and that debate will go on. even if it is in this room, we all decide that we have a common answer to that question, it will go on, and its shadow on, and we should always be introspective about the things we do. my personal belief is that having given iraq and opportunity -- first of
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13